Why hearing health matters

When you hear well, you are well equipped to embrace the life you want.

Whether you are bonding with your loved ones or enjoying your favorite television show, your hearing plays a fundamental role on your overall well-being.

When voices become less clear
 

Hearing loss can creep up gradually. Some sounds remain audible, while others, like higher-pitched sounds, become more difficult to hear.

If you do not hear well, it’s hard to understand and talk to your loved ones and beyond. Hearing loss is also associated with a number of health issues:

Phonak Icon less social interaction / human being in a house Less social interaction and increased loneliness1

Phonak Icon unhappy face Less participation in activities with friends or events2

Phonak Icon human brain Increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia3

Phonak Icon human being falling Increased risk of falls4

Oír bien es sentirse bien, familia feliz sentada en un sofá y disfrutando con un videojuego

Oír bien, es sentirse
bien

Tratar la pérdida auditiva puede suponer un impacto positivo en el bienestar físico, cognitivo y socio-emocional.

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Audiometría en línea de Phonak

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Realice su audiometría en línea gratuita y descubra lo bien que oye.

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Oír bien es sentirse bien, hombre sonriendo

Pérdida auditiva

Más información sobre los indicios, los tipos y las causas.

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Referencias
 

1. Kramer, S.E., Kapteyn, T.S., Kuik, D.J., & Deeg, D.J.H. (2002). The association of hearing impairment and chronic diseases with psychosocial health status in older
age. Journal of Aging and Health, 14(1), 122–137
2. Vas, V., Akeroyd, M. A., & Hall, D. A. (2017). A data-driven synthesis of research evidence for domains of hearing loss, as reported by adults with hearing loss and
their communication partners. Trends in Hearing, 21.
3. Loughrey, D.G., Kelly, M.E., Kelley, G.A., Brennan, S., & Lawlor, B. A. (2018). Association of Age-Related Hearing Loss With Cognitive Function, Cognitive Impairment,
and Dementia. JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery, 144(2), 115-126
4. Jiam, N.T.-L., Li, C., & Agrawal, Y. (2016). Hearing loss and falls: A systematic review and meta-analysis. The Laryngoscope, 126(11), 2587–2596

1. Kramer, S.E., Kapteyn, T.S., Kuik, D.J., & Deeg, D.J.H. (2002). The association of hearing impairment and chronic diseases with psychosocial health status in older
age. Journal of Aging and Health, 14(1), 122–137
2. Vas, V., Akeroyd, M. A., & Hall, D. A. (2017). A data-driven synthesis of research evidence for domains of hearing loss, as reported by adults with hearing loss and
their communication partners. Trends in Hearing, 21.
3. Loughrey, D.G., Kelly, M.E., Kelley, G.A., Brennan, S., & Lawlor, B. A. (2018). Association of Age-Related Hearing Loss With Cognitive Function, Cognitive Impairment,
and Dementia. JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery, 144(2), 115-126
4. Jiam, N.T.-L., Li, C., & Agrawal, Y. (2016). Hearing loss and falls: A systematic review and meta-analysis. The Laryngoscope, 126(11), 2587–2596